Tag Archives: Autonomous Access Point

Convert Lightweight AP into Autonomous AP

There are a number of ways to convert Lightweight AP into Autonomous. I personally prefer two.

First method is to use Console connection. It works very well, but of course requires a console, which in some cases can be troublesome – i.e. someone will have to arrange a PC connected to the network and console connection to the AP, which also has to be reachable from the PC once IP address is configured (i.e. L3 reachability). It also requires to press and hold Mode button before powering up an access point, which then has to be held up to 30 seconds until LED turns red. After that Mode button can be released and AP falls into rommon. Now, it’s just a matter of few commands:

set IP_ADDR 192.168.1.100
set DEFAULT_ROUTER 192.168.1.1
set NETMASK 255.255.255.0
tftp_init
tar -xtract tftp://192.168.1.10/c1140-k9w7-tar.153-3.JC2.tar flash:

These commands assign IP address, netmask and default gateway to AP, initialize TFTP service and then download .tar archive with the image from TFTP server (192.168.1.10) and extract its contents into flash. After this step is completed, AP can be either power cycled, or forced to boot with new image (using “boot” command). Also, I recommend to format flash before extracting new image  using “format flash:“.

Works like a charm, but as I previously stated, requires a direct console connection.

Second method allows to downgrade Lightweight AP with Autonomous IOS without console access, but it requires AP to be accessible via SSH or Telnet. Once in AP’s CLI execute the following:

debug capwap console cli

This command enables full range of CLI commands, like config terminal, archive, or format flash (which by default are not available in LAP’s CLI). Therefore, it is now possible to do the following

archive download-sw /overwrite tftp://192.168.1.10/c1140-k9w7-tar.153-3.JC2.tar

Reboot and you’re on IOS code now.

Hope this helps.

 

A correct way to shutdown Cisco Autonomous AP

An interesting fact – powered over Ethernet autonomous Cisco access point continue to associate clients even if you shutdown the relevant switch port! I recently shutdown the switch port to which a spare access point has been connected, assuming it will stop providing PoE. Few days later my friend’s IT specialist reported their customers have connectivity problems when they approach that particular access point. He also asked if the blue light reflects a working condition. That knocked me down. How could it be powered on if I administratively disabled the switch port?! Read more …